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Detroit Home Magazine | October 2019

 

Beyond Excellence

By Patty LaNoue Stearns | Photos by Beth SInger

 

There’s a beautiful story behind this Bloomfield Hills home, and it begins with a boy and a girl who started dating in junior high, fell in love, and spent few moments apart from then on. They married, had children, built a life together, and when their kids were old enough to fly away, the empty-nesters sat down with designer Elizabeth Fields, of  Elizabeth Fields Design in Franklin, and a team of architects, builders, and other experts and started planning their dream home.

 They knew it would be U-shaped, with all rooms open to a courtyard; large enough for overnights, with lots of privacy for their grown sons and their future families, siblings, and other visitors, with areas for strolling supper parties and many different seating options — all with beautiful sight lines — for dining or snacking or reading or playing board games. The lower level would include more bedrooms and baths, as well as  space for workouts, casual lounging, and doing laundry.

There would be natural light and open views of their estate, with lush landscaping and flowers everywhere. There would be an indoor pool and exercise room, and an outdoor pool with an attached whirlpool for year-round activity. It would be constructed of the finest materials, feature enduring modern style, and serve as a quietly elegant ode to their love.

 But in the beginning stages of the project, the husband unexpectedly passed away. “Then a decision had to be made, and everybody on the team supported the wife and we forged ahead (as the couple had planned),” Fields says.  

“Truly, this is a home built for love,” adds Alex Eisenberg, Fields’ chief executive officer, who was deeply involved in the design and execution of the plans, which took six years. “From an architectural standpoint, you can feel the home, which projects tranquility, happiness, and love.”

Read the rest of the article Here

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